#103 A Kabbalistic Journey Through Time (2)

“The Zohar is not a book but a phenomenon.”

David’s second lecture in his series, A Kabbalistic Journey Through Time, explores the extraordinary ideas and contributions of the:

  • Zohar,
  • Tikkunei HaZohar,
  • and Sefer ha-Temunah.

In his discussion of the Zohar, David examines its dynamic interpretation of the Torah and how it applies this interpretation to the structure of the sefirot. He also looks at the way the Zohar explores the cosmic links between G-d, Israel, creation, and history.

The Tikkunei HaZohar, David explains, is concerned with the Divine presence in the various domains of the universe as well as in exile. Among other things, he considers the Tikkunei HaZohar’s discussion of the feminine Divine presence – the Shekhinah – and Her quest to find unity and completion with Her male counterpart, the blessed Holy One.

The final text David examines is Sefer HaTemunah, which is predominantly concerned with the Divine in time. All things emanate from G-d and return to Him, David explains, and time is divided into cosmic cycles.

In discussing these three important texts, David provides the historical and cultural background to their emergence in Jewish history and their impact on mystical thinking. He also shows his audience the size and presentation of the books and discusses their availability for interested readers – in English, Hebrew, and Aramaic.

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#81 A Journey Through Jewish Philosophy (3)

This Jewish Philosophy lecture explores the emergence of Neoplatonism in Jewish philosophical thinking. David examines the ideas and works of three Jewish philosophers living during the later years of the Golden Age of Spanish Jewry:

  • Shlomo Ibn Gabirol
  • Baḥya ibn Paquda
  • Yehudah haLevi.

Going in-depth into the contributions of Shlomo Ibn Gabirol, David discusses:

  • Keter Malkhut
  • Tiqun Midot haNephesh
  • Mekor Ḥayyim

looking at the philosopher’s exploration of:

  • Divine essence as primal cause
  • Matter and form
  • Divine will.

Watch the lecture here.

In the second part of the lecture, David compares the works and ideas of Baḥya ibn Paquda and Yehudah haLevi. He also discusses the latter’s philosophical enquiry presented in his book, The Kuzari.

Throughout the talk, David ensures the historical and intellectual context of the figures he examines – and their ideas – remains ever-present. He also provides clear and concise summaries of these ideas for a lay audience.

        

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